LinkedInformed Podcast. The LinkedIn Show

Welcome to episode 132, I’m busy with training & speaking engagements this week so I pre-recorded this episode. Therefore if any big news has recently broken, I won’t be covering it till next week!

You may recall in episode 79 I interviewed the founders of an interesting product called Autopilot about their Chrome extension that automatically viewed LinkedIn profiles.
As I have mentioned in recent episodes, I have experienced several issues with Autopilot recently and really didn’t feel that it was a product that I could continue to recommend.

I still believe autoviewing is a valuable and a potentially highly productive action on LinkedIn so I set about finding an alternative product to recommend.


What is Autoviewing?

Autoviewing is a simple task conducted via a browser (normally Google Chrome) extension. Once the extension is installed you are able to ask it to view a list of profiles from a search result on LinkedIn.
Autoviewing extensions are ostensibly bots, i.e. a software application that runs automated tasks (scripts) over the Internet. Typically, bots perform tasks that are both simple and structurally repetitive, at a much higher rate than would be possible for a human alone.

As a free LinkedIn member you are currently only able to view 150 profiles per day** whereas a premium member (Business Plus, Executive, Sales Navigator, Recruiter lite & Recruiter Professional) you can view up to 1000 a day*
*These numbers are subject to change at any time
** A LinkedIn ‘day’ is from 5pm to 5pm EST or

By the nature of autoviewing, it’s a numbers game so to get impressive results, you really need one of the above premium accounts.

Why do it?

LinkedIn’s most popular feature is ‘Who’s viewed your profile’. On average 8-12% of people viewed will view your profile in return, this figure can be much higher if you view people that are known to be more active (possible with Sales Navigator).
So viewing hundreds of profiles in a day will lead to gaining a high number of profile views which raises your profile, increases the number of invitations to connect you receive and may even help to win you business.
In addition, this high level of activity can have a positive effect on how the algorithm views you, i.e. you appear to become more ‘interesting’ and this can have a positive knock on effect to other areas of LinkedIn.
The effectiveness of autoviewing is significantly improved with;
A strong profile, with a good headshot and clear, compelling headline
Viewing targeted (not random) search results, appropriate to your objectives.

Do LinkedIn Allow it?

I have never seen a quote from LinkedIn that expressly bans the use of autoviewing extensions but I think it’s fair to say that by using them you are in breach of the user agreement.
Here’s what the user agreement has to say about the use of bots;

This however, does not mean it’s wrong.
The definition of ‘wrong’ is entirely up to you - it’s a personal decision.
I personally think that viewing profiles is a harmless activity whereas I believe that sending automated messages, skill endorsements and invitations is spam and therefore, ethically crosses the line.

LinkedIn has limits on the number of profiles you can view and this is subject to change so it is essential that the company you purchase an autoviewing product from is completely on ‘top of their game’ in this respect.

Whilst LinkedIn do not openly approve of autoviewing, it’s also pretty obvious that they benefit from it;
It increases page views which helps them sell more advertising
Users have to buy a LinkedIn premium account for effective autoviewing

The net result is that it is very rare to hear of people running into problems with LinkedIn when they autoview - provided they stick to the guidelines which are made clear by all providers.


At the end of the day, you have to make a decision on what feels right to you. As previously mentioned your ethics do not have to mirror LinkedIn’s rules!

The Options

I have come up with two alternative solutions, Dux-soup and eLink Pro, I like both for different reasons.

I looked at a product called LinMailPro initially but it’s main features are automatic connection requests and messaging and I believe those actions to be unethical - it also Autoviews but it’s more expensive than the following two options (due to those extra features).


eLink Pro

Features

Autoviewing of up to 800 profiles per day.
Compatibility with Sales Navigator
7 day scheduler
Download viewed profiles & who viewed you.
Drip marketing feature. Posts motivational quotes for you.
Will favourite a tweet from every applicable person you view.
Semi automation of invite accept message.
Adds some icons to profiles
Shows number of followers in profile.

Advantages
Substantial business that was established in 2014, has strong backing and 20 employees providing good customer support.
Scheduling feature is very useful for when you are on holiday or away from the office for a few days.
Free trial for 5 days and at the time of writing they are extending that to 1 another month for $1


Disadvantages
Using LinkedIn in a different tab (whilst autoviewing) sometimes causes issues.
It’s expensive at $147 every 3 months or $95 per month
No ‘skip’ already viewed feature.

Dux-Soup

Features

Configurable autoviewing of up to 1500 profiles per day (not advised)
Advised viewing numbers of 150/day for free LinkedIn users, 400 for Business+, 600 for Sales Navigator premium accounts
Profile skip feature (skipped if viewed within the last x number of days)
Google X-ray search feature (400 per day)
Group members autoview
Download of visited profiles (to .csv)
Auto endorse skills
Variable visiting speed (configurable)
Re-visit based on previously downloaded CSV
Notes and tagging of profiles
Searching by tag

Advantages


Free service allows an extended trial to see benefits
Tagging very useful, especially for this not on a Sales Navigator account
Cost - only $15 per month for Pro version

Disadvantages

Small and somewhat anonymous business behind the software
No scheduling
Auto endorse feature encourages bad practice.

Summary


I have used both products extensively over the last month or so, interchanging between them regularly to make a realistic comparison.
At the end of the day I think both are great and well worth considering.

Dux-Soup’s greatest benefit is pricing whereas eLink pro has the useful scheduling feature and the company behind it does give me more confidence of longevity and capable customer support is something not to be sniffed at given that the reason I am looking at these products is due to Autopilot’s deficiencies in that area!

Direct download: LinkedInformed_132.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to episode 131, this week’s episode is mostly dedicated to the big news announced by LinkedIn last week.

I believe these changes will have a significant impact on how we use LinkedIn, it’s going to take a fair bit of getting used to…once we have it.

Before I get stuck into the announcements I did see one interesting article about Facebook for Work, which is going to be launched very soon.
Personally I think it will be a major flop…..What do you think?


The New LinkedIn Design

This is Amy Parnell, Senior Director, User Experience Design on stage, explaining the new design.

Below is a screenshot of the new homepage with arrows pointing to all the subjects I discuss in the podcast;

I also made a short video explaining some of the changes
<embed https://youtu.be/iTuHCOV-RpE>

and here is the new look profile;

The New Feed

This doesn’t actually look much different but apparently they have been making lots of changes ‘under the hood’, the idea is that we should see more relevant posts and articles in our feed and under ‘trending’

New Messaging

Potentially very exciting! This is how the new messaging app will look in the main page (as opposed to the Messages page)

LinkedIn Learning

I’m not convinced about a subscription model for pricing but they are allowing Job seeker, Business Plus and Executive premium account holders free access to LinkedIn Learning. Shockingly though Sales Navigator and Recruiter premium account holders do not get access. Where is the logic in that?

That’s it for this week, I hope you found that useful.

If you get the new design, please get in touch and let me know what you think.

Direct download: LinkedInformed_131.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to our 130th episode.

Interesting Stuff I saw this Week

Here are the links to the interesting things I saw this week

Your Guide To Generation Z
What LinkedIn’s ‘Social Selling Index’ Really Measures
Searching and Viewing Profiles from Sources Outside of LinkedIn
LinkedIn’s original 2004 pitch slide deck
Jeff Weiners full interview with Oprah


Thought LEADers

A key focus of social selling is to engage with your Leads on subjects that are of interest to them (rather than what you are offering them). There are however another set of people that you should work just as hard to engage with that aren’t leads, they are Thought LEADers.

You are highly unlikely to do business with these people but they could be the key to unlocking the most difficult Leads.

Building relationships with thought leaders can pay off big time. Your Leads will see you as more credible, you will have your finger on the pulse regarding topics that are important to your Leads and this will also help you write better, more relevant content.
If you do this really well, you might even find that your Leads are chasing you rather than the other way around!

Three Critical Questions

If you are in a sales role or you are hoping to win new customers on LinkedIn then can you answer the following questions;

What business subjects are important to your Leads?
Who are the thought leaders in these subjects?
Where do these thought leaders actively post and engage online?
You can answer these questions by conducting the Six Steps outlined in my published post.

Direct download: LinkedInformed_130_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to episode 129, at the end of a busy week for LinkedIn having delivered their social selling conference Sales Connect in New York.
I was keenly watching the Twitter feed and some updates from people I knew were there to hear reaction to some of the big announcements made.

In this episode I’m going to dive into the 5 main announced changes to Sales Navigator. Don’t worry of you don’t have a Sales Navigator account, this could still be very relevant to you.

But before all that I spotted these interesting things in the news this week;

Reid Hoffman is so against Trump, he created a card game!
LinkedIn Siri integration goes live with the launch of iOS 10
3 new LinkedIn services in India


Sales Connect 2016

I wasn’t able to make it to New York but I did the next best thing and followed on Twitter.

Various speakers talked about the exciting world of social selling including several case studies, Chris Anderson from TED talks appeared to be the most popular but I bet Malcolm Gladwell was pretty good too!

Various statistics were quoted, many I have heard before but these did grab my attention;

“Sales & Marketing are blending into one”

“Personal value has to 2X the impact over business value. 71% of B2B buyers who see personal value will purchase”

“92% of B2B buyers engage with sales professionals who are known industry thought leaders”.

“EY have 30,000 Sales Navigator licences”!!

The five really big announcements

Sales Navigator is becoming an open platform (at last!). Initial CRM partners are Oracle, SAP Hybris, SugarCRM, Hubspot and Netsuite.
New search filters for Lead builder. Size of department, Senior leadership, revenue, HQ zip code, department growth and content keywords.
InMail 2.0. Improvements to SN inMail allowing a compose box to the side, attachments and ‘write to CRM’
Notes & Tags. This includes the ability to filter searches by tags.
Gmail extension. Very similar to Rapportive.

 

Direct download: LinkedInformed_129.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to episode 128, this week I want to revisit the subject of advertising.

Firstly some interesting stuff I saw this week;

A company called We are Flint interviewed just over 2000 UK adults to determine the level of social media usage. The results for LinkedIn make interesting reading;

LinkedIn Advertising


This still seems to be a thorny issue for LinkedIn with another set of less than inspiring results announced recently.
In Q2 marketing revenue was $181, just 19% of their income and over 60% of this came from sponsored updates.

You may recall we covered advertising in episodes 85. 92 and 94 when listener Peter Gold experimented with LinkedIn ads. The conclusion wasn't very positive!

So I was intrigued when I came across someone who describes himself as a ‘LinkedIn ads evangelist’!

AJ kindly gave up some of his time to chat with me this week about LinkedIn ads.
How they work and who should and who shouldn’t be using them. It’s a fascinating insight and finally puts to bed the question once and for all.
Summary
If your typical customer has a high lifetime value (tens of thousands plus) then LinkedIn ads can be very powerful (if done correctly).
So it seems that, as usual LinkedIn are solely targeting large enterprises.

Does having an email address in your headline still penalise you in search results?

This questions relates to a blog post I wrote in 2014;
LinkedIn Search is Changing

The answer is yes, nothing appears to have changed since that post.
I have just checked this on 5 different searches and on every occasion the person who either has an email address or a telephone number in their headline or name fields comes either last or last page in a search result - even though they were active (key factor in the search algorithm) and 1st tier connections

Direct download: LinkedInformed_128.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to episode 127, I hope you all had a fantastic week.

In this episode I attempt to get my head around the millennial problem - i.e. Why don’t Millennials use LinkedIn?

Firstly though a few things I found interesting this week;

  • New content search on the LinkedIn app
  • LinkedIn Profinder expands to the whole of the US
    New iOS 10 launch this month will include deeper SIRI integration into LinkedIn

    The Millennial Question

    I read a very interesting article this week from Allen M. Quinn titled 5 Reasons Why Millenials Aren’t Using LinkedIn.

    I thought this was a very interesting subject and worth further consideration. As a father of two millennials (who are both nowhere near LinkedIn!) I have a particular perspective to bring to the issue and it struck me that you might also.

    I contacted the author Allen and despite viewing my profile, he didn’t come back to me - Bloody Millennials!!!
    To be fair, I only reached out yesterday so he may come back yet but I was unable to arrange to interview him for this episode - perhaps that might work for another episode.

    I would urge to read not only the piece itself but also the comments, which include contributions from millennials and those of an older generation - it’s very interesting.

    What is a Millennial?
    Whilst there is no definitive birth date range, Most experts state that a Millennial (formerly known as Gen Y) is someone who was born between the early 1980s to the early 2000’s so effectively they range between age 15 and 35 although I think most people think of millennials as being in their 20s.

    Earlier this year LinkedIn published some analysis showing that 87 million millennials were on LinkedIn. At the time LinkedIn had 433 million users so that is 20% millennials and not the 38% quoted in Allens article.

    My first point is that I am not sure that's 20% is necessarily such a bad figure.
    The US census of 2015 showed that millennials accounted for about 28% of the population so it could be better but it's not disastrous!

    Allen details five reasons so I thought it would make sense to address each one individually.


    Too many "rules"/ Too structured:

    This really covered two subjects, Firstly it seems to be about etiquette with millennials being unsure about what to say and what is okay.
    I think this is an issue created out of being a minority rather than a millennial, if you are only 20% of any community you are bound to find it intimidating!
    My advice would be to encourage millennials to take more risks and not be intimidated by negative feedback.
    Allen states that he has witnessed someone's update getting slammed by LinkedIn users and publicly shaming that person for it but surely this happens across all social media, In fact LinkedIn is significantly “tamer" than most - have you seen Reddit?!!
    Millennials should aim to show humility in their posts and be open about their desire to learn more about online networking, this approach will inevitably lead to greater success.
    Finally I think the 80% of users who are not millennials need to show a much higher level of empathy towards this demographic.


    2. It's not a "Fun" Social Media:

    Isn't that what Facebook, snapchat, Instagram and twitter are for?
    I don't think there is anything wrong with having a bit of fun on LinkedIn but it is essentially a business network and therefore one would expect it to be less ‘light hearted’ than social networks that are focussed on your personal life.
    Social media doesn't have to have a singular purpose (Fun), what about;
    Career advancement
    Learning and personal development
    Network expansion and relationships.
    These are all areas of great value to millennials, even if they might be perceived as "less fun”

    3. It's neither private nor exclusive. EVERYONE can see your stuff

    Why does LinkedIn need to be private?
    As opposed to social networks that are more geared towards your personal life, LinkedIn is focused on your professional life and the biggest difference therefore is that your professional life is something that you do want people to see.

    That said, If someone really does want to be more private they have settings they can adjust and in my opinion those settings are no more complicated than settings in other social networks.


    4. No one to connect with:

    This is a difficult one for millennials because by default they are bound to know less people but we all have to start somewhere and there is no rush to get to thousands of connections!

    In the article he talks about the idea that it appears to be ‘weird’ to reach out to strangers with an invitation to connect - I couldn't agree more! It is pretty weird and millennials would be wise to not do it and that goes there every other age group as well!


    5. Premium is way too expensive:

    This is undeniably true, LinkedIn price their products for large enterprise sized organisations who are less cost sensitive.
    That said, there really is no need to upgrade your account.
    The jobseeker premium account is pretty much a waste of time in my opinion. Millennials can get plenty of use and value from Linkedin without having to upgrade their account.

    Conclusion

    Despite my comments above I do agree that there is a problem here, millennials are not using LinkedIn as much as they could and here is what I suggest could be done to resolve that;

    LinkedIn could do a lot more to showcase LinkedIn to millennials, they seem far too focused on generating revenue from large corporates at the expense of their members including this cohort.
    Earlier this year LinkedIn produced a Millennial Playbook which was a good idea implemented very badly. When you click on the link above you'll see that you have to sign up with your email and contact details in order to receive a free copy of the playbook. This is far too restrictive and not helpful. LinkedIn need to make this a simple PDF that can be downloaded without the need to enter any information.

Video is much more user-friendly, especially for millennials so LinkedIn should produce a series of videos showcasing examples of how millennial's have had great success using LinkedIn. I would suggest they use a different company/production team though as most Millennials I know would cringe at their normal style of video!
We all need to encourage millennials on LinkedIn. It is our responsibility to show more empathy and encouragement to this generation.
The greater use of gamification could be very helpful. Why not show users how ‘interesting’ they are? We know the algorithm is constantly assessing our profile and activities so why not showcase this on our home page. Millennials typically respond well to gasification and it will make LinkedIn appear to be more fun.
I think a mentoring programme would work exceptionally well on LinkedIn, this could be user driven via a group but it would be much more effective if it was implemented by LinkedIn. Over 35’s could volunteer to mentor a millennial and help them, not just with LinkedIn but business networking in general.

Direct download: LinkedInformed_127.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to episode 126, this week was a special week for me as I had the opportunity to attend a two day InStruct course at LinkedIn’s office in London.

In this episode I want to address two topics;

  1. The experience of spending time with LinkedIn
  2. An update on Sales Navigator

InStruct is a training programme designed to assist those responsible for implementing and managing the adoption of Sales Navigator in their organisation. It is in effect a ‘train the trainer’ course but is really aimed at corporate in-house trainers rather than an independent external trainer such as myself.

Sales Navigator is a premium upgrade version of LinkedIn designed for sales professionals with a focus on a social selling methodology.

LinkedIn London

In the 8 years I have been a LinkedIn trainer my relationship with LinkedIn has had it’s ups and downs.

In the early days of the London office I met some great people who I developed trusting and productive relationships with.

Things seemed to change around 2011 when the company went through an IPO and people like me seemed to be ostracised, I still had contact with LinkedIn but always felt a sense of distrust, defensiveness and blatant secrecy from them.

So you can imagine that I was feeling an interesting mix of excitement and trepidation as I signed in as a visitor this week.

First impressions were equally mixed, the reception area was very cool with funky iPads required to sign in that sent a message to the person you were visiting, on the negative side though part of the signing in process involved signing an NDA (non-disclosure agreement) which immediately had me wondering if nothing had really changed beneath the surface!

And then I met Miguel and Donna.

The amazing Miguel and Donna at the traditional London phonebox in LinkedIn London’s reception.

I can’t speak highly enough about Miguel and Donna. They both have a deep understanding of social selling and a genuine passion for LinkedIn, they also made me feel extremely welcome and valued.

Within an hour all my reservations about secrecy and distrust were dissipated.

These guys are great ambassadors for LinkedIn because they are honest, open, funny and  knowledgable.

Cultures do not change overnight and I’m sure there are plenty of things that LinkedIn can still improve but if these two are an example of the ‘New LinkedIn’ then we have a lot to look forward to (so long as Microsoft don’t decide to change things!).

The offices are some of the nicest I have seen (and I have seen many), each floor has a different theme but all based around London/England.

We spent time is a Musical themed room, a Fish and chip shop room, a Sweet shop room and my favourite of all, the classically English ‘afternoon tea’ room.

On the second day I had to deliver a 30 minute presentation on Sales Navigator that was assessed, a score below 70% would result in failing the course so I spent some time the night before practising!

Fortunately I managed to pass with flying colours - Can you image the embarrassment if I failed?!

So now I just have to complete a post course assignment and I will be a LinkedIn-approved Sales Navigator Trainer!

Whilst that will be nice, the most important goal for me was to establish a more productive relationship with LinkedIn and thanks to the attitude of Miguel and Donna, I’m confident that has been achieved.

Sales Navigator

This is an update to my original review of Sales Navigator (SN) in episode 83.

The main difference I see now is that they have improved on the most important element of this social selling tool - focus!
LinkedIn can be a very distracting place and sales people often have a tendency to get easily distracted so LinkedIn have worked hard to ensure that a Sales Navigator user can stay on the SN platform all the time without having to keep flicking back to Linkedin.

This is critical and I’m impressed that LinkedIn have improved it in this way.

The home page in SN has no distractions, just a stream of updates, comments and news articles from and about saved leads (people) and Accounts (companies).

You can create status updates of your own (including images) from the SN interface and comment and like your leads and accounts updates. The only thing you can’t do is create a published post, which is probably the next thing they will address.

I also gained a better understanding of the unique TeamLink function.

TeamLink helps you find the strongest path to someone you’d like to meet by
showing you the best routes to an introduction. Those routes can be through
your direct connections or via others on the sales team, even if you
aren’t directly connected.

For instance if a colleague in your sales team used to work at ABC plc and during that time your target (prospect) also worked there then SN will show your college as a TeamLink introduction opportunity. They (prospect & colleague) do not have to be connected, just ex colleagues.

Again this is only likely to be required in large sales teams but in effect you are growing your range of possible introductions exponentially.

Unfortunately they still have a separate inbox for SN, the argument also being focus but I have a problem with this.

What happens if an individual sends you a message on LinkedIn enquiring about your services?

This message will land in the messaging area of mainstream LinkedIn.com and if you are spending all your time in SN then you might miss something critical. They do provide a link in SN to messages but it does not indicate you have an unread message as it does for replies to your messages sent from the SN Inbox.

My sense is that this is far too convoluted to work and a more simply unified inbox is required.

They have also added tags and notes to profiles in SN and the likelihood is that these will become a lot more useful (maybe searchable) although at the moment they are for information only.

I still take issue with their pricing though, It is pretty clear that LinkedIn are focussing on Enterprise clients and the pricing reflects this, especially now that they have removed the Navigator Basic account that I currently have.

Conclusion

If a company with a substantial sales team (over 50) is serious about social selling then I believe Sales Navigator is a no brainer. The tool os designed to help you win more customers through greater engagement and introductions.

For smaller businesses the verdict is less clear. If they still had the Basic level product and pricing I would be more tempted to recommend it but at £650 per year for each user, it’s a much closer call.

Social selling is relevant and important to all B2B businesses, large and small but LinkedIn are just not (yet) focussed on SME’s.

So I’m on the fence but it’s definitely worth taking a months free trial.

As for Recruitment, if you believe your job is about finding people and advertising jobs then Recruiter or Recruiter Lite are your most suitable upgrades. If however you believe that relationships are key to successful recruitment (as I do) then I actually think SN is more tailored to your needs. It also has a fantastic search function plus a reasonable InMail allowance but most importantly it focuses on what is more important - people and engaging with them.

If I had my old job back and was running a 30 consultant recruitment business, I would be investing in Sales Navigator licences.

 

Direct download: LinkedInformed_126.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:54am UTC

Welcome to episode 125, I’m back from an amazing holiday in Italy and the English Cotswolds so plenty to catch up on this week……

Whilst away my Linkedin messages built up and it occurred to me that LinkedIn could really do with  an ‘out of office’ auto reply feature similar to that which you get with emails. LinkedIn is unique in that being work related, people are less likely to login whilst they are on holiday.

LinkedIn are renown for copying features from other social media sites but on this one I would like to see them innovate.

What do you think?

Autopilot

Due to a string of problems I have stopped using Autopilot for LinkedIn and can no longer recommend it. I still believe in the idea of auto viewing though and I am looking into a couple of alternatives.

I will keep you informed.

The data scraping bots issue

LinkedIn sues 100 individuals for scraping user data from the site

LinkedIn suffers huge bot attack that steals members’ personal data

 

LinkedIn are saying very little about this but the lawsuit they have filed suggests they are trying to discover the names of people who have created false accounts and used sophisticated bots to circumnavigate LinkedIn’s security to obtain information that is being sold on. I suspect this might be email addresses or possibly full profiles for out of network members.

It could be that some extensions or 3rd party products are involved (although none have been mentioned anywhere), I noticed that the email finder extension Prophet have revamped their terms of use - coincidence?

 

LinkedIn Quietly Publish 2nd Qtr results

These results were released with little fuss and no earnings call, I assume because of the proposed Microsoft takeover. After all investors really don’t care how well they are doing now that a price has been agreed!

I still care though as the quarterly results are one of the best ways of finding out what is going on at Linkedin.

Highlights

  • Members grow to 450m
  • Unique visitors plateau at 106m
  • Revenue $933 (31% yoy growth)
  • Revenue split was 64% Talent solutions, 19% marketing, 16% premium (Mostly Sales Navigator)
  • No word on member growth in China but given the slow down of overall member growth I assume it’s not that impressive.
  • 59% of LinkedIn traffic is via mobile

Links;

 

The financials spreadsheet

2nd quarter announcement

The Welcome Return of the Hashtag

A few years ago LinkedIn had a wonderful feature called LinkedIn Signal. It was a very popular tool that allowed you to search for status updates via keywords and is still greatly missed.

The good news is that we can now search status updates again via hashtag searches.

This is important for two reasons;

  1. You can use hashtag searches for research purposes to find people that are posting content about subjects that are important to you. This is a great way to find information and new contacts to expand your network.
  2. Your updates have a greater chance of being found if you remember to use a hashtag.

It’s not as good as Signal was but it is definitely a step in the right direction.

The only downside is that the hashtag only becomes active (a tappable link that creates a search) on the mobile app.

This may just be a feature they are testing so it might disappear or it might be rolled out to desktop soon as well….let’s hope so!

In the meantime I would advise adding hashtags (just a couple) to every status update you post.

LinkedIn Influencer Videos

A big fuss was made about this while I was away…personally I think it’s rubbish!

So someone from LinkedIn sends out a question to a select list of Influencers who (via a specific new app) post a short 30 second reply….whoopdeedoo!

Don’t get me wrong, this could be a positive move if LinkedIn A) roll it out to all members and B) allow people to post what they want (rather than answer a stupid questions such as the shown one below)

What’s the first thing you do every morning to prepare for the day?

 

Direct download: LinkedInformed_125.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to episode 124, this week I’m relaxing in Italy on vacation so I thought I would pre-record this episode of questions that I have been asked recently.

Below are the 5 questions I covered in this episode, you will need to listen to the audio for the answers.

Question 1


I recently decided to get rid of some dead wood connections, people that I'll never speak to that I either don't remember connecting with, or when I first joined and didn't really know what I was doing. I managed to get rid of 2000 people, mostly overseas, and now my news feed is looking better, and more relevant. I have noticed one significant change though, when I had around 5,000 connections, I'd get maybe one person sending me connections requests every week, they could be anything from people I actually recruit for, or SEO specialists wanted to sell to me. Now however, since dropping a couple of thousand people, I'm getting about 8 per day, which seems very strange. Do you know if the less connections you have, the more you appear in searches, or that people can find you easier? I've never heard anything like that but that's all I can think of Any clues would be greatly appreciated.

Question 2

Hi Mark, as an active job seeker I am curious to know what Recruiters think of LinkedIn endorsements?

Question 3

Hello Mark, I have a question I hope you can answer.
I am wanting to add links to several web pages with Lead boxes.
I have tried to do this under my summary but the thumbnail image is the same for all three. How can I change the image that LinkedIn selects?
Thank you.

Question 4

Hi Mark, I have a question about invitations.
Where can you see a list of people who you have sent an invitation to connect?
Thanks

Question 5

Hi Mark,
I want to change my status to read ‘open to opportunities’ but I can’t recall where this is done.
Can you help?


That’s it for this week. If you have any questions please feel free to send me a voicemail (link on the right edge of this page) or email me at mark@linkedinformed.com.
In case you are curious, the website I used for the voices in this episode is http://www.fromtexttospeech.com/

Direct download: LinkedInformed_124.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC

Welcome to episode 123, I’m back in my office this week with plenty to talk about.

Interesting stuff I saw this week

LinkedIn are in the process of rolling out a new feature that automatically makes you a follower of someone when you invite them to connect. If that member subsequently rejects your invitation by selecting ‘ignore’ then you will cease to be a follower.

Also

  • Interview with Jeff Weiner where he refers to some skills endorsements having a greater value than others.
  • New profile views limit warning. Does this mean that LinkedIn are now tracking views by the IP address used? This could be a problem to those using Google searching as a workaround to the commercial use limit.


Direct download: LinkedInformed_123.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:30am UTC